The Canvas as Schoolyard

Most of the students who attend my workshops have one thing in common: they all wish to find their own style, a way of painting different and unique that will allow their personality to shine.

Even if they get inspired by another, and often well-known, painter, or even if their favourite painting theme has been painted thousands of times before, they are still seeking the little particular touch that will make all the difference.

In order to find this unique touch, one must paint a lot, of course, but above all, one must feel free to experiment. It is in fact the game of experimentation that opens the door to interesting discoveries. To repeat what other artists have already done is a good way to perfect one’s technique, but to be able to find a unique style, one must take time to explore. While a good mastering of the mediums is mandatory, the liberty of playing with chance is essential.

When we play, we don’t make mistakes. The only thing we risk is to be ourselves. We have to get back the same state of mind as when we were in the schoolyard. We have to feel as curious as when we were discovering a game for the first time,

when we were playing for the fun of finding out what will happen.

Paint as you play, with fun.

Imagination must free itself and fly. The canvas is the schoolyard. When a painter invents a style, he invents a new game.

Of course, one has to learn the rules and become smart enough as to not get tangled in technical problems. But more we paint freely, giving ourselves the chance to err, more the doors to imagination will open themselves.

The roads to originality require a free attitude while painting. The painter must play like a child, totally submerged and concentrated on the invention of new games. One who paints like this has no fear and there are no obstacles to his or her imagination. Unfortunately, people have a strong tendency to recreate on canvas the world outside; they repeat patterns and annoying rules, in this only place where they could be free.

Whatever the school he represents, a painter who has a unique style is an artist who overcomes the fear of being alone in the act of creation. You stand there in front of your canvas, with a naked mind, you open the valves, let the images flow, and then you can start.

During my workshops, my main goal is to bring my students to paint with imagination while absorbing the different techniques, the same way they used to play at a game while inventing their own strategies. Then I see, with pleasure, their style appears on the canvas, a discovery I never get tired of.

In my workshops, I offer the schoolyard and the art of play. The style only comes from the student who brings it when he or she accepts to play the game.

Yvan Genest has worked and exhibited in Puerto Vallarta for over fifteen years, becoming one of the most recognized artists of the city’s artistic scene. He is represented locally by Galleria Dante. His next Magical Effects Workshops will be held from December 19th to 23rd, 2011, and from March 5th to 9th, 2012, at Hacienda Mosaico.

The canvas as a schoolyard


Most of the students who attend my workshops have one thing in common: they all wish to find their own style, a way of painting different and unique that will allow their personality to shine.

Even if they get inspired by another, and often well-known, painter, or even if their favourite painting theme has been painted thousands of times before, they are still seeking the little particular touch that will make all the difference.

In order to find this unique touch, one must paint a lot, of course, but above all, one must feel free to experiment. It is in fact the game of experimentation that opens the door to interesting discoveries. To repeat what other artists have already done is a good way to perfect one’s technique, but to be able to find a unique style, one must take time to explore. While a good mastering of the mediums is mandatory, the liberty of playing with chance is essential.

When we play, we don’t make mistakes. The only thing we risk is to be ourselves. We have to get back the same state of mind as when we were in the schoolyard. We have to feel as curious as when we were discovering a game for the first time,

when we were playing for the fun of finding out what will happen.

Paint as you play, with fun.

Imagination must free itself and fly. The canvas is the schoolyard. When a painter invents a style, he invents a new game.

Of course, one has to learn the rules and become smart enough as to not get tangled in technical problems. But more we paint freely, giving ourselves the chance to err, more the doors to imagination will open themselves.

The roads to originality require a free attitude while painting. The painter must play like a child, totally submerged and concentrated on the invention of new games. One who paints like this has no fear and there are no obstacles to his or her imagination. Unfortunately, people have a strong tendency to recreate on canvas the world outside; they repeat patterns and annoying rules, in this only place where they could be free.

Whatever the school he represents, a painter who has a unique style is an artist who overcomes the fear of being alone in the act of creation. You stand there in front of your canvas, with a naked mind, you open the valves, let the images flow, and then you can start.

During my workshops, my main goal is to bring my students to paint with imagination while absorbing the different techniques, the same way they used to play at a game while inventing their own strategies. Then I see, with pleasure, their style appears on the canvas, a discovery I never get tired of.

In my workshops, I offer the schoolyard and the art of play. The style only comes from the student who brings it when he or she accepts to play the game.

Living a life entirely devoted to his art for over 30 years,Yvan Genest spends his time between his Montreal hometown and Puerto Vallarta studios, while remaining very active in the Paris, Los Angeles and Seattle art scenes. His works have attracted an international circle of collectors seduced by the contemporary and timeless strength of his iconograph.